Delices d'Annie

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The Emmenthal, a cheese included in some Les Delices d’Annie’s recipes

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The Emmenthal is a cheese that has strong taste that can be eaten as-is or in some dishes. Les Delices d’Annie presents you this cheese that have been for ages mistaken for gruyere because of the eyes (the holes), and some of its varieties.

The Emmenthal, a swiss cheese

cheese-delices-dannie

The Emmenthal is a cheese that comes from Switzerland that is used as ingredient in some of Les Delices d’Annie dishes. Its name comes from the Emme valley, the Emme is a river that runs through the Berne Swiss canton. This area is particularly rich in pastures and undeniably agricultural. It is nevertheless also produced in some other cantons: Argovie, Glaris, Lucerne, Schwyz, Soleure, Saint-Gall, Thurgovie, Zoug, Zurich and in the districts of Lac and Singine in the canton of Fribourg.

This hard cheese is obtained by pressing and cooking with cow milk and is characterized by the numerous holes, called eyes, on it. The origin of these holes has a scientific explanation: they come from the little particles of hay that are on the cow’s udder and fall into the milk at the milking. These particles produce some gas during the fermentation process. Within its French varieties, there is the Emmenthal Grand cru made in the Franche-Comté region and the Emmenthal of Savoie which is the biggest French cheese.

How to taste the Emmethal cheese?

feuilletees-delices-dannieThe Emmenthal can be eaten as-is, sliced or in little cubes as a side dish for a cold meal (in sandwiches, petits fours and canapés, salads, etc.). It can also be used to make some hot dishes as gratins or pizzas. Spices and herbs can help to optimize the taste of the cheese. Les Delices d’Annie proposes among its salted snacks some “Flûtes feuilletées” aromatized with Emmenthal, golden browned and crispy. You can eat them all day long or offer them as snacks at an aperitif or a cocktail.

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